The Tremendous 10 link roundup, #173

The Tremendous 10 link roundup, #173

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  1. Names and Locations of the Top 100 People Killing the Planet | “'The earth is not dying, it is being killed, and those who are killing it have names and addresses.' – Utah Phillips"
  2. What I Learned Co-Founding Dribbble | "Last month, I gave a 30-minute talk at the Awwwards conference in San Francisco. I used to give talks fairly often, mostly covering CSS and web design in general, but this one was a bit different. I decided to share 20 things I’ve learned by co-founding Dribbble over the last 10 years. The timing was cosmic, as I’d just made the decision to retire fully from Dribbble, stepping aside to figure out what’s next. More on that in a bit."
  3. 4 Ways to Improve Your Strategic Thinking Skills | "Analyzing, planning, and coordinating with peers will improve your strategies and the contributions you bring to the workplace."
  4. This Japanese Company Charges Its Staff $100 an Hour to Use Conference Rooms | "Everything has a price, which helps keep workers focused on the bottom line."
  5. How Pixar's cartoon cheese led to a smarter view of science | "The 3D animation that brought to life Remy in 'Ratatouille' and Woody in 'Toy Story' is illustrating complex scientific concepts to tell stories of a different kind."
  6. Using animated videos to explain innovative ideas and futuristic scenarios | "Explaining an innovative, abstract idea with just words or data can be extremely challenging. Animated videos make it possible to visualize even the most complex of subjects."
  7. Cartoonists of Color Database | "For visibility. For academia. For inspiration. For community building."
  8. Humans have made 8.3bn tons of plastic since 1950. This is the illustrated story of where it's gone | "Until recently we didn’t know how much plastic was piling up around us. When we found out, the picture wasn’t pretty."
  9. You Are Doing Something Important When You Aren’t Doing Anything | "We need to rest, to read, to reconnect. It is the invisible labor that makes creative life possible."
  10. I Wrote This on a 30-Year-Old Computer | "And it was awesome."